Tim Seitz

Share Your Thoughts on Implementing Adaptive Phased Management 2013 to 2017 - DRAFT FOR PUBLIC REVIEW

1. The draft Plan is built around seven strategic objectives. Are the objectives we have identified appropriate? Have we missed any key areas?

I disagree completely with the first two strategic objectives I believe we must prepare for permanent above ground storage at the sites where the nuclear waste was produced.

The third strategic objective must locate where used nuclear fuel, and all other nuclear waste produced can be contained and managed above ground at the nuclear station where it was produced.

The fourth strategic objective must simply make it our goal to get the money for the safe, long term management of Canada's used nuclear fuel. The money has not left the planet, it is there somewhere and we will need it.

The fifth strategic objective can be more easily met by storing all nuclear waste above ground in situ. Underground storage will require underground elevators which may simply die of decay and embrittlement et al, after 100 years or so of use will only exacerbate our management problems. Certainly the elevators will die, but the nuclear waste we created and needing our perpetual management will never die. Someday in a wiser age than ours someone may indeed find a use for our nuclear waste, So our obligation is to contain amd manage it and with hope until then.

The sixth strategic objective is absolutely essential for our work to go on. Looking at it another way, our work may become a societal stabilizing factor. For our steadfast commitment to seeing to our tasks requires our society to go on and continue to perfect itself. Because no matter, 'come hell or high water' it goes without saying that we absolutely must succeed in containing and managing the nuclear waste we are reponsible for.

Society will depend on that.

2. The draft Plan identifies work and activities we propose to undertake to accomplish these objectives. Have we set out appropriate activities?

No we have not set out appropriate activities because we have not even considered permanent in situ storage.

3. The draft Plan is intended to anticipate the challenges ahead and plan for them. Over the next five years, what are the key challenges that will need to be addressed?

The challenge of halting the putting together of another needlessly costly nuclear bureacracy and it's attendant infrastructure in place for purpose of transporting nuclear waste from some other point of nuclear waste production to another distanced place for the permanent underground storage, containment and perpetual management of nuclear waste brought from some other point of nuclear waste production on our one and only one planet. Our home.

The challenge of halting the putting together of another needlessly costly nuclear bureacracy and it's attendant infrastructure in place for the permanent underground storage, containment and perpetual management of nuclear waste brought from some other point of nuclear waste production on our one and only one planet. Our home.

4. What will the NWMO need to put in place to respond to these challenges?

A committee of both private citizens possessed of foresight and hindsight who, will mandate policy for the nuclear specialists possessed of the expertise and know how for building and preparing of the permanent above ground storage for all the nuclear waste produced at the sites where nuclear waste was and is produced.

5. Other comments, questions or suggestions?

Did you know that 90% of all the living biomass on this planet is below ground. What we see is the remaining 10% on and above Earth's surface.

We cannot just presume that we can just bury our 46,000 + tons of high level nuclear waste somewhere without taking into account its effect on Earth's other 90 % of all the biomass on our planet.

All the 46,000 and increasing by 2000 tons per year of our high level nuclear waste can and must be stored in situ at the place where it was produced. Giant pyramids or domes can be constructed to manage all this nuclear waste for eternity.

By producing this waste you have created a perpetual management job that will last longer than any extant society has ever been in existence. Furthermore, It must be stored up and above the water table and in a dry, waterproofed place.

Handling all our 46,000 tons of high level nuclear waste can be accomplished by robots, maybe similar to the Curiosity robot on Mars, in that they could be nuclear powered too. They will be suicide robots because when they become radioactive and can no longer operate effectively then they will have to be buried within the pyramid too.

Think about it, this idea will be much less expensive then transporting all this waste to some remote place and digging and maintaining an underground storage facility where the elevators would have to work and last for at least the half life of plutonium which is ~ 25000 years. - An unheard of impossibilty. And the attendant creation of two more odious tax dollar eating nuclear bureaucracies we do not need either. Keep all the waste under one roof. Become nuclear waste managers and not producers of yet more nuclear waste.

Sincerely

Tim Seitz


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