Investing in the future: Mamawmatawa Holistic Education Centre and Josie Bluff Memorial Christian School

Left to right: Laurie Swami, NWMO President and CEO, Esther Ferris, teacher/principal at Josie Bluff Memorial Christian School, and Cheryl Fort, Mayor of Hornepayne, at Josie Bluff Memorial Christian School.

Left to right: Laurie Swami, NWMO President and CEO, Esther Ferris, teacher/principal at Josie Bluff Memorial Christian School, and Cheryl Fort, Mayor of Hornepayne, at Josie Bluff Memorial Christian School.

Young people from Constance Lake First Nation are learning more about the skilled trades and Canada’s plan thanks to support from the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO).

 

Students and staff from Mamawmatawa Holistic Education Centre (MHEC) recently attended the Career and Trades Fair in Mississauga.

 

As part of their trip, the students also visited the NWMO’s proof test facility in Oakville. The 16 high school youth gained first-hand experience and a better understanding of Canada’s plan for the safe, long-term management of used nuclear fuel. The visit was made possible through a $3,000 sponsorship from the NWMO.

 

“I had a lot of fun going to the NWMO site. It was really interesting learning about how long things can be radioactive for. We even got to see all of the different machines that they work [with]. It was an awesome experience, and I really enjoyed it,” said Lavron Sutherland, a MHEC student.

 

“This was a great opportunity for students and staff to see first-hand what goes on and what will eventually happen in this process of storing nuclear waste. They also have learned of various job opportunities that would be available to them, which is important to the students and their careers, and future generations,” said MHEC Principal Stephanie Sutherland.

 

Ahead of the school’s visit to Mississauga and Oakville, NWMO President and CEO Laurie Swami visited MHEC and Josie Bluff Memorial Christian School (JBMCS).

 

Students in Constance Lake First Nation are gaining new fun and interactive tools to learn about STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics)

 

The NWMO is also supporting the robotics program at the JBMCS with more than $6,500 to purchase LEGO robotics kits and four iPads. Ms. Swami made the announcement on a recent visit.

 

“We are proud to continue investing in the future by supporting training, education and other capacity-building activities. This includes science initiatives to prepare young people for careers in scientific fields, including the nuclear industry,” Ms. Swami said.

 

“Thank you to [the] NWMO for the generous donation that they presented to our school. Our students (27) are very excited and looking forward to the new robotics program that we will be setting in place soon,” said Esther Ferris, a teacher and principal at the school. “I believe that this is an important program for our school as it will enhance the students’ learning in the areas of science and technology. It might also spark an interest for them to pursue a career in those fields in the future. Miigwetch!”

 

Constance Lake First Nation is one of many Indigenous communities actively involved in learning about Canada’s plan for the safe, long-term management of used nuclear fuel. The NWMO is committed to interweaving Indigenous Knowledge with western science and creating constructive relationships built on respect with Indigenous communities.