The NWMO helps Northwestern Health Unit respond to COVID-19

Photograph of Marilyn Herbacz

“It is during these times that we truly see community and partners pull together to achieve a common goal and wellness and safety for all people,” said Northwestern Health Unit Chief Executive Officer, Marilyn Herbacz.

The global COVID-19 pandemic is increasing pressure on social and essential services. In response, the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is making a one-time contribution of $50,000 to the Northwestern Health Unit (NWHU) to reach those most in need at this difficult time. 

The NWHU will use the investment to respond to community needs such as but not limited to, emergency food access and care packages for people who are in isolation without resources or family support, and hand sanitizer and disinfecting supplies for organizations in the area who need assistance.

“We want to thank everyone who is working to address this global challenge, in particular public health leaders like the Northwestern Health Unit, who are taking decisive action to protect the health of our communities,” said, Dr. Ben Belfadhel, Vice-President of Site Selection at the NWMO. “Investing in the health and well-being of the communities where we are active is a priority for the NWMO and we’re proud to do our part to help flatten the curve.”

NWHU Chief Executive Officer, Marilyn Herbacz, welcomed the donation from the NWMO.“On behalf of the NWHU, I am extremely pleased to accept this kind and generous donation. As we know these are unprecedented times and there is a growing demand within our communities for supports. It is during these times that we truly see community and partners pull together to achieve a common goal and wellness and safety for all people. The NWHU will ensure this substantial donation is used in the way that will reduce pressure and support our population through these times.” 
 
NWHU delivers its programs and services, including health promotion, preventing and managing outbreaks and emergency preparedness, to the Kenora and Rainy River Districts. The Township of Ignace, served by NWHU, is currently engaged with the NWMO as a potential host for a deep geological repository for Canada’s used nuclear fuel. 

The NWMO has responded to the global COVID-19 pandemic by supporting municipal and Indigenous communities involved in the site selection process. Recently, the NWMO also supported the Kenora District Municipal Association to help the organization establish reliable and secure communications between communities in the region in these difficult times.