About the NWMO

NWMO-Supported Students Take Top Honours at R&D Workshop

The NWMO’s Peter Keech (far left) poses with Prof. J. Clara Wren, Mojtaba Momeni, Shannon Hill, Thalia Standish, and Prof. David Shoesmith at the 2015 UNENE R&D workshop.

The NWMO’s Peter Keech (far left) poses with Prof. J. Clara Wren, Mojtaba Momeni, Shannon Hill, Thalia Standish, and Prof. David Shoesmith at the 2015 UNENE R&D workshop.

March 1, 2016

Toronto

By the NWMO

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The NWMO’s Peter Keech (far left) poses with Prof. J. Clara Wren, Mojtaba Momeni, Shannon Hill, Thalia Standish, and Prof. David Shoesmith at the 2015 UNENE R&D workshop.

The NWMO’s Peter Keech (far left) poses with Prof. J. Clara Wren, Mojtaba Momeni, Shannon Hill, Thalia Standish, and Prof. David Shoesmith at the 2015 UNENE R&D workshop.

One of the ways the NWMO plans for the long term is by helping support the research of exceptionally promising graduate students. In December, three of those students won first, second and third prizes at a poster competition held by the University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE). The competition, which was held in Toronto, brought together more than 50 graduate students from universities across Canada.

All three winners are PhD candidates studying under NWMO-sponsored Industrial Research Chairs at Western University.

Shannon Hill won first prize for "The Corrosion Evolution on Carbon Steel Under Deep Geological Disposal Conditions for Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste." Her PhD supervisor, Prof. David Shoesmith, holds an Industrial Research Chair in Used Fuel Disposal Chemistry.

Thalia Standish won second prize for "Galvanic Corrosion of Copper-Coated Carbon Steel for Used Nuclear Fuel Containers." Her PhD supervisor is Professor Shoesmith.

Mojtaba Momeni won third prize for "Effects of pH and Radiation on Galvanic Corrosion of Stainless Steel-Carbon Steel Welds." His PhD supervisor is Prof. J. Clara Wren, who holds an Industrial Research Chair in Radiation-Induced Processes.

"The prize winners are a credit to the NWMO, Western University and UNENE," said Dr. Peter Keech, the NWMO's Manager of Engineered-Barrier Science. "Their success here also reflects the importance of their research, which is yielding valuable insights about how copper and steel might hold up over the lifetime of a deep geological repository."

UNENE is an alliance of universities, nuclear power utilities, and research and regulatory agencies for the support and development of nuclear education and research and development capabilities in Canadian universities. The NWMO became an associate member of UNENE in 2011.

About the NWMO

The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is a not-for-profit organization tasked with the safe, long-term management of Canada’s used nuclear fuel inside a deep geological repository, in a manner that protects people and the environment for generations to come.

Founded in 2002, the NWMO has been guided for more than 20 years by a dedicated team of world-class scientists, engineers and Indigenous Knowledge Holders that are developing innovative and collaborative solutions for nuclear waste management. Canada’s plan will only proceed in an area with informed and willing hosts, where the municipality, First Nation and Métis communities, and others in the area are working together to implement it. The NWMO plans to select a site in 2024, and two areas remain in our site selection process: the Wabigoon Lake Ojibway Nation-Ignace area in northwestern Ontario and the Saugeen Ojibway Nation-South Bruce area in southern Ontario.
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the NWMO

The NWMO is a not-for profit organization established in 2002 by Canada's nuclear electricity producers in accordance with the Nuclear Fuel Waste Act (NFWA).

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